Men In Grey

Men In Grey (2009-2014).

“We are the lightning in an age of cloud computing.

“The Men In Grey (2009-2014) was a conspiracy, applied research framework and street intervention series that sought to engender greater techno-political subjectivity among computer users as to the growing risk of mass surveillance on computer networks.

Source: Men In Grey

The Sound and the Fury: Inside the Mystery of the Havana… — ProPublica

22 Americans and eight Canadians, would be diagnosed with a wide array of concussion-like symptoms, ranging from headaches and nausea to hearing loss. They would also find themselves caught up in an extraordinary international dispute, one that the Trump administration would use to sharply reverse the course of U.S. relations with Cuba.

Source: The Sound and the Fury: Inside the Mystery of the Havana… — ProPublica

Home-made drones now threaten conventional armed forces – Drones and guerrilla warfare

According to the Russian Ministry of Defence, which has so far refused to say who it thinks was responsible for the attack, the drones were guided by GPS and had a range of 100km. The electronics involved were off-the-shelf components, and the total cost of each drone was perhaps a couple of thousand dollars.

Source: Home-made drones now threaten conventional armed forces – Drones and guerrilla warfare

NBC dumps Olympic analyst amid fury at Korea-Japan comment | New York Post

Joshua Cooper Ramo – How does this guy become an analyst for NBC Olympic coverage? And get on the boards of Starbucks and FedEx?  Do we know so little of Chinese culture that we allow this buffoon to guide us?

“Every Korean will tell you that Japan is a cultural, technological and economic example that has been so important to their own transformation,” said Ramo, who sits on the boards of Starbucks and FedEx while working as co-CEO of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s consulting firm.

Source: NBC dumps Olympic analyst amid fury at Korea-Japan comment | New York Post

Why cops won’t need a warrant to pull the data off your autonomous car | Ars Technica

For now, federal law and Supreme Court precedent dictates that law enforcement has the authority to legally monitor anyone in public. The basic idea is that none of us have a “reasonable expectation of privacy” when we are in public. So just as the police can capture us with video cameras and license plate readers, so, too, could they contract with AV automakers to simply get at vast quantities of future AV data. And if the companies don’t want to play ball, such data can be accessed with a mere court order (known as a “d-order”) under the Stored Communications Act of 1986.

Source: Why cops won’t need a warrant to pull the data off your autonomous car | Ars Technica